Category Archives: Uncategorized

Last updates for now…

I’ve added some great new images of large ciliates from a forest stream in MacRitchie Reservoir. Flowing water is generally a bad place to look for protists, compared with standing water (e.g. ponds), but this large Euplotes and another large … Continue reading

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Help build the Encyclopedia of Life

[Update 6/09/2011 – Of course I would post this blog entry with screenshots the day before they update their web interface. Have a look at the new version!] Wouldn’t it be nice if you could go to a single resource … Continue reading

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New phytoplankton guidebook from Science Centre

The Singapore Science Centre has been publishing compact guidebooks to nature and wildlife in Singapore since 1981, beginning with A Guide to Pond Life. They’re cheap ($5 each), handy to carry around, and fully illustrated in colour, and so were … Continue reading

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Swimming jewels

Two days ago I took a pond water sample from the large pond/small lake in Kent Ridge Park. It’s a scenic, restful place: lots of greenery, still water, and if you look closely at the sandy sediment at the margin … Continue reading

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The Durian Flagellate

Today’s sample came from the Eco-Pond at the Singapore Botanic Gardens, and among the creatures darting about was a peculiar dark and barrel-shaped structure. It was moving so quickly that it took some time to track it down to a … Continue reading

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We’ve got video too!

I recently embedded quite a few videos in the pages of the Guide. Look in Free-living ciliates especially for some cool ones. If you want to browse all of them in one place, you can go directly to my user … Continue reading

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Beautiful slime

A selection of really beautiful pictures of slime mould fruiting bodies have been posted in the guide, thanks to Serena Lee of the Singapore Botanic Gardens. Despite the icky name, slime moulds can be very elegant in their fruiting state … Continue reading

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