Chrysophytes

Traditionally called the golden-brown algae. They are closely related to the diatoms; both fall in a larger group called the stramenopiles.

Most of the species encountered in freshwater are photosynthetic, though some are not and appear as unpigmented flagellates.

Contents

Anthophysa
Dinobryon
Mallomonas
Ochromonas
Synura


Anthophysa

Colorless colonial chrysophyte with cells in clusters at the end of a long stalk. There are two flagella, but one is much shorter than the other.


Dinobryon

Solitary or colonial chrysophyte with vase-shaped lorica (test). Large yellow-brown chloroplasts, one long flagellum emerging from the mouth of the lorica, a second flagellum is hard to see.


Mallomonas

Motile chrysophyte with scales and spines covering the cell body. Long flagellum emerges from the anterior end of the cell and appears to be responsible for its motility.


Ochromonas

Small round chrysophytes with two flagella, one of which is much shorter, like the other chrysophytes. Large yellow-brown chloroplasts. Note the red eye-spot. Ochromonas swims rapidly and was abundant in the sample where this was found.


Synura

Colonial chrysophyte with scales ornamenting each cell. The colonies are radially-symmetrical clusters which are freely-swimming. Each cell has two flagella, one of which is much longer. Red eye-spot is also present in each cell.

Detached individual cells are also visible:

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